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Midnight Lunch with Thomas Edison: What’s the Difference Between Collaboration and Teamwork?

When: Friday, Mar 1, 2013, 12:00 PM until 1:00 PM
Where:
Webinar by Internet and phone
IL  
Additional Info:

Contact: Elene M Cafasso
Category: Professional Development event

Registration: Closed
Payment: Payment In Advance Only
Event Rules: Be sure to provide your email address. Instructions for joining into the webinar will be emailed to registrants the evening of Thursday, February 28th.
Cancellation Policy:
Capacity: 0
Available Slots: 0
Registrants & Fees:
RegistrantFee
Booth StaffNo Fee
Booth Student$ 5.00
Non-member$ 10.00
UCWBG memberNo Fee
 

Midnight Lunch with Thomas Edison: What's the Difference Between Collaboration and Teamwork?, Webinar

 

Teams form a crucial component of our everyday work lives.  Studies reveal that more than 70% of all US workers  are involved in a face-to-face team of some type.  But now,US companies also report that over 40% of their employees are also engaged in virtual teams, with this figure expected to rise to 56% in the next three years. The increasing trend toward virtual team structures will bring changes in how we spearhead projects and navigate group relationships.  How can leaders and executives begin to effectively address these shifts?

 

In addition to the rise of virtual teams, other factors are impacting how we view collaborative efforts. By 2025, Generation Y will rise to dominate the US  workplace with a population of nearly 80 million people. Their work style preferences reflect a desire for smart devices that link them to the outside world as well as to others within their organization. Collaboration will come to play a central role for employers seeking to attract and retain this crucial cadre of employees. As well, global trends including an influx of 1 billion working age adults into the global workforce within the next 10 years will yield new work styles in businesses of all types, with collaboration proving pivotal to innovation efforts spearheaded within this massive group.

 

As the US workforce continues to shift with the influx of Generation Y, how can leaders ensure team efforts reflect real collaboration? What is the difference between true collaboration and teamwork? How can we form collaborative teams that are more productive and innovative?

 

An innovation author and senior executive, Sarah Miller Caldicott is a great grandniece of Thomas Edison. Sarah has spent years researching Edison’s revolutionary practices for insights on how we can apply his methods in the 21st century. Her newest book, MidnightLunch: The 4 Phases of Team Collaboration Success from Thomas Edison’s Lab examines how Edison built collaboration as a backbone to his world-changing innovation empire.  Building upon his unique collaboration principles, in less than 40 years Edison developed patents and break through industries valued at over $6.7 billion. 

 

In this webinar, Sarah will reveal:

  • How collaboration serves as a spur for innovation
  • The core principles Edison used to drive collaboration and collegiality in his business operations
  • What today’s leaders and executives can do to drive collaboration and not just teamwork
  • Why the global reset which flowed from the GreatRecession transformed how we think about collaboration now

 

Through Sarah’s webinar, you can apply the following learning in your work efforts or personal life:

  • 4 steps you can take to lay a foundation for collaboration in your team ororganization
  • How to deepen collegiality through engaged collaboration experiences like “midnight lunch”
  • The importance of forming smart layers versus hierarchies in collaborative teams
  • The value of inspirational leadership to collaboration, and how you can begin serving as one

 

Be to include your email address.  Instructions of how to join in the webinar will be emailed to registrants the evening of Thursday, February 28th.

 

About our Presenter

A great grandniece of Thomas Edison, Sarah Miller Caldicott has been engaged in creativity and innovation throughout her life.  Sarah spent the first 15 years of her 25-year career as a Marketing executive with major brand-driven firms, including Quaker Oats and the Helene Curtis subsidiary of Unilever. As a leader of global innovation teams, Sarah was responsible for major brand launches in the US, Europe, and Asia.

 

Sarah spent several years researching Edison’s innovation methods with experts at Rutgers University. She co-authored the first book ever written on the subject of Edison’s world-changing innovation processes, entitled Innovate Like Edison: The Five-Step System for Breakthrough Business Success. Sarah’s book isused as an innovation textbook in graduate and undergraduate programs across the US. Innovate Like Edison has been featured in The New York Times, Fortune Small Business, and USA Today.  Sarah has also appeared as an innovation expert on PBS television, CNBC, the Fox Business Network, and NPR.

 

Sarah’s upcoming book, Midnight Lunch: The 4 Phases ofTeam Collaboration Success, from Thomas Edison’s Lab (Dec. 2012, Wiley& Sons Publishing) brings Edison’s collaboration approach into the digital era. Midnight Lunch will be featured in Fast Company magazine upon its release.

 

CEO of her own consultancy, The Power Patterns of Innovation, Sarah develops innovation programs that drive growth and relevance for organizations seeking new ways of thinking and working. Sarah offers expert training and guidance on how to build innovation and collaboration capabilities inorganizations of all sizes. Her clients include Intel, John Deere, Emerson, the Mayo Clinic, and Microsoft as well as small and mid-size for-profit and non-profit operations.

 

Sarah holds a BA from Wellesley College and an MBA from the Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. She has four boys.

 


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